The Girl With Two Souls

 

tgw2s

The Girl With Two Souls

 

Kora Blackmore, thrown into Bedlam mental hospital by her father – Britain’s leading industrialist Sir Tantalus Blackmore – is one day visited by a mysterious gentleman, who gains her trust then makes off with her to his family home in Sheffield. But Kora is afflicted with a bizarre condition, that the hospital believes is a second soul – the girl Roka – somehow living inside her.

Roka however is much more intractable than Kora, and far less obliging. Soon she is caught up in street politics, disorder and protest – and all without Kora’s knowledge.

With the agents of Sir Tantalus closing in, Kora and Roka must survive in their new circumstances and with their friends uncover the sequence of events leading to the incarceration; for although Kora is an illegitimate nobody, it seems her upbringing was devised to meet an enigmatic and ghastly end…

Reviews

‘… I am no longer a fantasy reader and am not a great fan of alternate history or YA so it was really something of a pleasant surprise that I found the book really very enjoyable… The Girl with Two Souls captures the feel of the Edwardian era whilst also introducing the fantasy and steampunk elements in a very natural manner.’ [SFF Chronicles]

‘… steampunk, automata, a girl with two souls? Intriguing and interesting! And the book does not disappoint… The story sweeps along; while the focus is on Kora and Roka, there are glimpses of the rest of society and the Empire outside the city. I would highly recommend this to any steampunk lovers or anyone after a character-focused YA adventure.’ [SFF World]

‘This slickly written first volume of the trilogy paints a fantastic alternative Edwardian society with an almost cinematic story quality that pulls the reader into the curious and deftly created world and is thoroughly engrossing from start to finish. I think the best compliment I can give is that immediately upon finishing volume one, I bought volume two. Highly recommended.’ [amazon]

‘I can’t wait to read the next part which is a good sign. A wonderful tour de force of a book…’ [amazon]