Top 10 favourite albums of the year

by stephenpalmersf

Not quite a Top 10 of what was released this year, but…

 

Björk, ‘Utopia’

Having stopped following Björk over a decade ago after the knotty Medulla and the messy Volta, I found myself intrigued by reports of flutes and the return of choirs to her new album. Utopia is akin to my favourite of her albums, Vespertine, and sounds a bit like the sonic equivalent of Art Nouveau. A gorgeous album.

 

BNQT, ‘Volume 1’

Realising that ace songwriter Tim Smith was never again going to grace a new Midlake album, I wondered what this new direction would be like. It’s the guys from Midlake with an album created from pairs of songs by well-know writers, including Fran Healy from the amazing Travis and that guy out of The Kaiser Chiefs (a band I never got). Volume 1 is a good album, but I can’t help wondering what Tim Smith is up to…

 

Saz’iso, ‘The Least We Can Do Is Wave Our Handkerchief’

Bought on the strength of not knowing what Albanian music sounded like and some great reviews. Emotional, beautifully sung (and played) music.

 

Stornoway, ‘Beachcomber’s Windowsill’

Randomly bought in Tubeway Records on the strength of its terrific cover and packaging, this turned out to be a wealth of great songs and inspired playing. After hearing this I bought the band’s most recent album, which alas turned out to be their last. Vibrant and tuneful.

 

The Parson Red Heads, ‘Blurred Harmony’

Most of my friends can’t understand why I love this band (who they deem mild American country-rockers) but my reply is the one I always give when asked this question – the songs, the tunes. This release is up to the band’s usual standard, though with fewer female vocals, which is a shame, as that aspect of the singing was one of the high points of their peerless Yearling.

 

Jean-Luc Ponty, ‘The Atacama Experience’

Having wondered what the violin maestro had been up to recently (I was a huge fan of his ever-evolving works in the ‘eighties) I was pleased to notice a studio album from 10 years ago that I’d never encountered. With more emphasis on jazz than before, and his first ever (!) acoustic violin piece, it’s a marvellous listen.

 

Fleet Foxes, ‘Crack-Up’

A long wait after the outstanding Helplessness Blues, this third album proved to be a complex, almost progressive work of many instruments and many fragments. It’s got melody and charm, but perhaps lacks something from losing a song-based structure. Still good though, and way ahead of most of the competition.

 

North Sea Radio Orchestra, ‘Dronne’

I bought this after falling for Arch Garrison’s wonderful I Will Be A Pilgrim, which is a kind of love-letter to prehistoric southern England. This is an orchestrated work, with a similar focus on melody. More complex and less immediate than the solo work, it’s still terrific.

 

Renaissance, ‘Live At The BBC’

Having been a fan of this criminally under-rated band for decades, and having seen them return to live work in Britain (Annie has for ages been a resident of America) a couple of years ago, I was very keen to get this classic BBC concert from 1977, which before release had only been viewable on YouTube. It’s superbly put together, with lots of extras. They simply were one of the all-time greats, with a songwriter (Michael Dunford) and a lyricist (Betty Thatcher) almost without equal. Wonderful band, and a total delight to see this in pristine DVD quality.

 

The Coral, ‘Butterfly House – Acoustic’

I can’t believe it took me 5 years to realise this existed. I love the original album – my favourite of their fantastic output – and this highlights the strengths of the songs, provided by the Skelly brothers. Beautifully played and sung, entirely on acoustic guitars. Unbeatable.

 

renaissance

 

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