Childhood & Death In Victorian England

by stephenpalmersf

Childhood & Death In Victorian England by Sarah Seaton

I read this as research for my upcoming novels Monique Orphan and Monica Orvan. The title of the book says it all. These were grim times for children, who not only had to cope with extremes of poverty, exploitation and lack of opportunity, but who also had to deal with the same issues modern children experience in Britain: a culture which doesn’t like children, and which, if not following the old maxim “seen but not heard,” still manages to treat them too often as something to ignore.

One aspect of Victorian life that comes over strongly in this book is how the role of women as uneducated baby-producers limited them to a life of social imprisonment, fit only for domestic duties. But ignorance is not bliss. Ignorance led to millions of appalling lives, not only for women, but for the children they bore.

Some of the stories related here are extraordinary. The male-created need for birth legitimacy led to some terrible crimes. In an ironic conclusion, the author remarks on how little seems to have been learned since 1901 when it comes to looking after children. Too many readers of her book would agree with her.

childhood

Advertisements